UU Dictionary of Biography

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Winchester Profession

The Creed - 1803


We believe that the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments contain a revelation of the character of God and of the duty, interest and final destination of mankind.

We believe that there is one God, whose nature is love, revealed in one Lord Jesus Christ, by one Holy Spirit of Grace, who will finally restore the whole family of mankind to holiness and happiness.

We believe that holiness and true happiness are inseparably connected, and that believers ought to be careful to maintain order and practice good works; for these things are good and profitable unto men.

Conditions of Fellowship - 1899

The Boston Declaration amended and adopted by the General Convention of 1897, at its session in Chicago, Illinois, and adopted as an addition to the Winchester Profession in 1899 declared the conditions of fellowship in the Universalist Church to be as follows:
I.The acceptance of the essential principles of the Universalist faith, to wit:
The universal fatherhood of God.
The spiritual authority and leadership of His son, Jesus Christ.
The trustworthiness of the Bible as containing a revelation from God.
The certainty of just retribution for sin.
The final harmony of all souls with God.
The Winchester profession is commended as containing these principles, but neither this nor any other precise form of words is required as a condition of fellowship, provided always that the principles above stated be professed.

II. The acknowledgment of the authority of the Universalist General Convention and assent to its laws.

The Liberty Clause - 1899

The Winchester profession is commended as containing these principles, but neither this nor any other precise form of words is required as a condition of fellowship, provided always that the principles above stated be professed.

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